Useful links


‘Keep Me Safe’ project

• What?
– The ‘Keep Me Safe’ project is a new European project to prevent
  sexual abuse and violence against people with disabilities in Europe

• Goals
– To enable young people with learning disabilities to protect
  themselves against sexual abuse and violence across Europe

• How?
Through the development of policies and programmes to ensure that:
– young people living with learning disabilities enjoy intimate relationships
  without putting themselves at risk
– they have access to sexual and reproductive health information and services

• Outcomes
– A training manual for the staff who work directly with young people
  with learning disabilities
– A best practice manual to set standards at a European level

The ‘Keep Me Safe’ project is a new European-wide initiative which aims to empower young people, aged between 10-24 years old, with learning disabilities to protect themselves against sexual abuse and violence across Europe. The initiative will work towards the development of policies and appropriate programmes to ensure that young people living with learning disabilities enjoy intimate relationships without putting themselves at risk and that they have access as others to sexual and reproductive health information and services, including family planning. It will achieve this by facilitating exchange between organisations that are already experts in working with people with learning disabilities, and organisations who would like to initiate or expand their work in this field.

The project will produce a comprehensive package of tools, including a training manual for the staff who work directly with young people with learning disabilities, and a best practice manual to set standards at a European level.

‘Keep Me Safe’ is a two-year European-wide initiative coordinated by the International Parenthood European Network (IPPF EN) and co-funded by the European Commission (DG Justice – Daphne III Programme). More information on the IPPFN EN website and on the first issue of the project’s newsletter.


The Josephine project

• What?
– Josephine is an anatomically correct life-size cloth doll which is used to help women with disabilities
  learn about and discuss sexual health and relationship issues

– Through their interactions with Josephine, the women are enabled to communicate questions and
  concerns about sex that they may not have the words to say

• How?
Through the use of:
– Drama
– Role playing
– Group activities

There is also a male version of Josephine to help men with learning disabilities to learn
and discuss sexual health and relationship issues.

The Josephine project is a creative learning resource for sex education aimed at helping women with disabilities to raise awareness about sexual health and relationship issues. Josephine is a life-size doll which interacts with women with disabilities through the use of drama, role playing and group activities to help these women communicate sex issues that they may not have the words to say.

Women with learning disabilities are especially vulnerable to sexual abuse, and the Josephine project aims to support them on issues concerning relationships, abuse and sexual health. The initiative consists of a 10 week course in which Josephine will look into a broad range of important issues, including dating, personal safety and choice, safe sex and contraception, and those that women wish to look at during the course.

The Josephine project is an initiative of the British arts organisation Them Wifies, after their work showed how unaware women with disabilities were of their own bodies. The group has recently begun classes for girls under 16, and a series of workshops has since been adopted by a range of other organisations in other parts of Britain.

There is also now a male counterpart to Josephine to help men with learning disabilities to learn and discuss about sexual health and relationship issues. They were presented during the project partners’ meeting in Leeds.

More information (English only)